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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have to change my brake pads but @ the dealer ship and every else like tirekingdom, it costs
$400 to change them (labor only) so is there any one who has changed them themselves
that can tell me about it or refer me to a guide or a different website with a " how-to" or something?????? Thanks! [help]
 

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Have you ever changed your pads on any vehicle before? It's really not much diferent. I'll take a look around for a DIY...but you should be able to do it if you have had any experience.
 

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yer lucky you dont need rotors also. every place told me i need new rotors most likely when the pads go because the stock VW rotors and other german company rotors can not be resurfaced
 

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Don't know why you can't turn the rotors at least once. I don't like to though. Rotors are cheap, and easy to install. Good chance to upgrade a little too. Turning them too much will cause you to lock up, or in our case continually dump the ABS.

I did a search today looking for service manuals for the GTI, but they stop at 2005 (MKIV). I needed one anyway, but was going to scan and send you guys the pages you need.

My advice... Find any of your handy frineds to walk you through it for a few bucks or a few beers. Once you have done it, its like someone else said, they are all pretty much the same. There are some tools you will need though, and the cost of the first time, may approach what the dealer wanted. Need the pads of course, and don't get the cheap ones. Good breaker bar, 3 ton floor jack (yes you could use less, but my motto is bigger is better), 6 - 8 " C clamp, 1/4" clear hose, jack stands and misc. other crap. But, even with a friend that knows what he is doing, ONLY DO ONE SIDE AT A TIME! You may need to go back to see how the damn thing goes back together (happens more than you would think).

Where are you guys at?
 

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Rotors on new cars are essentially throw aways ( or so they say ) they make them thin so they have to be replaced and cant be turned because they are already barely within spec. Feel the rotor, if there is any area where its gouged, i would reccomend a new rotor, but if its smooth still, i personally would just do a pad swap and leave the rotor as is, doing it yourself will save you a ton, i just did mine on my Durango...took 30 minutes and brakes are just fine ( it has ABS as well ) Fahrenheit doesnt need new brakes since it only has 150 miles on it since yesterday lol
 

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TOE_FAST said:
Rotors on new cars are essentially throw aways ( or so they say ) they make them thin so they have to be replaced and cant be turned because they are already barely within spec. Feel the rotor, if there is any area where its gouged, i would reccomend a new rotor, but if its smooth still, i personally would just do a pad swap and leave the rotor as is, doing it yourself will save you a ton, i just did mine on my Durango...took 30 minutes and brakes are just fine ( it has ABS as well ) Fahrenheit doesnt need new brakes since it only has 150 miles on it since yesterday lol
Thats funny, that last set I did was my wifes Durango. Those are really simple. Havn't needed to do the rears yet. You?
 

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if you really care about stopping you should have the rotors turned if there are any grooves so that the pads and rotors can "bed in" properly. All of the times I've changed my pads I've had to turn the rotors or replace them. Driving through mud, puddles, slush, snow and ice has caused hard spots and soft spots that have always needed to be "smoothed over" before the new pads could be put on.

Here's a link http://www.hawkperformance.com/performance/hps.php#

some pads also have a burnishing procedure that should be followed.

With some of the American made cars I've changed brakes on have required Torx fittings if you have those make sure you buy the "socket drive" variety not the kind that goes into a screwdriver or drill you won't be able to apply enough torque to break the bolts loose without it... oh and sometimes they are "reverse threaded" check your maintenance manual or Chilton's guide or even Autozone's website...

Hope this helps you all...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
so yeah if someone can get a manual for the car or a manual of a model with similar brake setup please thanks ohh and im in miramar florida [help]
 

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CTREE96 said:
if you really care about stopping you should have the rotors turned if there are any grooves so that the pads and rotors can "bed in" properly. All of the times I've changed my pads I've had to turn the rotors or replace them. Driving through mud, puddles, slush, snow and ice has caused hard spots and soft spots that have always needed to be "smoothed over" before the new pads could be put on.
The problem is that if you take the rotors in to be turned ( on most new cars ) they wont do it because they are already too thin. You put yourself at greater risk of rotor failure by turning an already thin rotor making it thinner, than you do swapping pads and having the 2nd set wear faster or uneven.

If you turn a rotor and they fail you could crash and do more damage to your vehicle, if you do a pad swap and you get another 15k miles on the car, then do a rotor and pad swap all at once, you go longer, save money and arent in danger by driving on super thin rotors.

Thats my experience anyway - good luck

Back rotors/pads are ok on the durango, but wont be long ill do those pads (swap) too
 

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You will also find sometimes that cost of turning the rotors is pretty close to buying new. I tend to warp mine, and just change them out.

Anyone able to find a service manual for the MkV?
 

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TOE_FAST said:
CTREE96 said:
if you really care about stopping you should have the rotors turned if there are any grooves so that the pads and rotors can "bed in" properly. All of the times I've changed my pads I've had to turn the rotors or replace them. Driving through mud, puddles, slush, snow and ice has caused hard spots and soft spots that have always needed to be "smoothed over" before the new pads could be put on.
The problem is that if you take the rotors in to be turned ( on most new cars ) they wont do it because they are already too thin. You put yourself at greater risk of rotor failure by turning an already thin rotor making it thinner, than you do swapping pads and having the 2nd set wear faster or uneven.

If you turn a rotor and they fail you could crash and do more damage to your vehicle, if you do a pad swap and you get another 15k miles on the car, then do a rotor and pad swap all at once, you go longer, save money and arent in danger by driving on super thin rotors.

Thats my experience anyway - good luck

Back rotors/pads are ok on the durango, but wont be long ill do those pads (swap) too
TOE_FAST I don't disagree with you I've only been able to re-use the rotors 2 times. I'm sorry I should have clarified that it isn't always the the best idea to turn the rotors... The shops that I've had turn my rotors wouldn't do the work if it made the rotors thinner than what the manufacturer specifies/requires... I had a set turned for a 99 Chrysler Sebring the new rotors would have been $200 for the pair so I saved about $180 by turning those... on my 03 Subie I had to replace the rotors because I warped them too much so I got some cryogenically treated rotors... best money spent on brakes ever for me...
 

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TOE_FAST I don't disagree with you I've only been able to re-use the rotors 2 times. I'm sorry I should have clarified that it isn't always the the best idea to turn the rotors... The shops that I've had turn my rotors wouldn't do the work if it made the rotors thinner than what the manufacturer specifies/requires... I had a set turned for a 99 Chrysler Sebring the new rotors would have been $200 for the pair so I saved about $180 by turning those... on my 03 Subie I had to replace the rotors because I warped them too much so I got some cryogenically treated rotors... best money spent on brakes ever for me...
[/quote]

Right on - I just wanted to make sure people knew that most newer cars cant even be turned, buying rotors and pads and doing the job yourself is the cheapest, if you dont have the mechanical ability or tools, having a shop or dealer do it is gonna get expensive unfortunately.

I wanted to turn the rotors on my Durango initially and then i was educated about "throw away rotors" from the manufacturer ( how new cars are super thin and barely within spec ) great way for manufacturers to make more money off us unwitting consumer types. Anyone know if aftermarket rotors are more likely to be thicker and "turnable" ? If so it might be the best option to take everything off ( when its time ) and trade up to a thicker and better rotor, but i digress as i dont have any info to back that up.
 

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Here ya go, sorry, for what ever reason I can't copy the little pics that go along with the instructions...

Torque wrench V.A.G 1331
Piston resetting tool T 10145
RemovingIf reusing brake pads, mark location. Install in same position when installing otherwise uneven braking will occur!
Remove wheels.
Using screwdriver, pry off brake pad retaining spring from brake caliper - arrow - and remove.
Separate connector - 1 - for brake pad wear indicator.
Remove caps - arrows - .
Loosen both guide pins - arrows - and remove from brake caliper.
Remove brake caliper and secure with wire so that the weight of the brake caliper does not burden or damage the brake hose.
Remove brake pad from brake caliper or from brake carrier.
Cleaning:
CAUTION!
Do not blow out the brake system with pressurized air, because the resulting dust is hazardous to your health!

Thoroughly clean brake pad mounting surfaces on brake carrier, and remove corrosion.
Clean brake caliper, especially the adhesive surface for the brake pad, it must be free of residual adhesive and grease.
Use only appropriate solvents for cleaning brake caliper.
InstallingBefore pressing piston into cylinder using piston resetting tool, brake fluid must be extracted from brake fluid reservoir. Otherwise, if reservoir has been topped off, fluid will overflow and cause damage.
Press piston back into caliper housing.
Remove protective foil from backing plate of the outer brake pad.
Set outer brake pad onto carrier.
Insert inner brake pad with retaining spring in brake caliper (piston).
When installing brake caliper, make sure that brake pad is not affixed to brake caliper before the correct installation position has been reached.
Do not damage adhesion surface.
Tighten brake caliper to brake carrier using both guide pins.
Install both caps.
Install retaining spring in brake caliper.
Connect harness connector of brake pad wear indicator.
Install wheels.
Tightening torque specification for wheel bolts Suspension, Wheels, Steering - Repair Group 44
Note:
After replacing brake pads, depress brake pedal firmly several times with vehicle stationary so that the brake pads are properly seated in their normal operating position.
After changing brake pads check brake fluid level.
Torque specification:
Guide pin to brake carrier 30 Nm
 

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michaelbaby said:
so yeah if someone can get a manual for the car or a manual of a model with similar brake setup please thanks ohh and im in miramar florida [help]
i know a guy that works at a VW dealership (VIsta) its on US1 and i forgot what else. send me a PM if you want his number he will pull yer car around back after they close and do whatever you want to the car for pretty cheap.
 

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Along the same lines of this thread... Has anyone had to adjust your emergency brake yet? I pull on mine pretty hard some time when I roll up on a cop, and I don't want to show brake lights. Well, I know it is not the best thing for it, and it is now sloppy. what am I facing when i pull the wheel? Is it a wheel cylinder driving the e brake in the top hat, or is there an adjustment that I can makeon the cable upstream somewhere?
 

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Gunny said:
Along the same lines of this thread... Has anyone had to adjust your emergency brake yet? I pull on mine pretty hard some time when I roll up on a cop, and I don't want to show brake lights. Well, I know it is not the best thing for it, and it is now sloppy. what am I facing when i pull the wheel? Is it a wheel cylinder driving the e brake in the top hat, or is there an adjustment that I can makeon the cable upstream somewhere?
I'm not sure....I haven't gotten taht far yet...I'll check the vortex, there's Euro's on there that have been rolling around in MKV's a bit longer than us, somebody has to have gotten there by now! O0
 

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Gunny said:
Along the same lines of this thread... Has anyone had to adjust your emergency brake yet? I pull on mine pretty hard some time when I roll up on a cop, and I don't want to show brake lights. Well, I know it is not the best thing for it, and it is now sloppy. what am I facing when i pull the wheel? Is it a wheel cylinder driving the e brake in the top hat, or is there an adjustment that I can makeon the cable upstream somewhere?
I learned my lesson with E brakes a long time ago, when i had my Jetta i would E brake in parking lots covered in snow...great fun but i ended up getting alot of slop in the E braje , so much so that it got to the point opf being gummed up and i had to have it cleaned out and relubed to get it back to an acceptable position.

On my fahrenheit i only use it just enough when i park it on the slope of my driveway ( i noticed that if i put it in park without the E brake and it rolls back, when i turn it on and try to shift into reverse or neutral there is a little bit of a clunk to get it to engage - but if i put it in park and then E brake it before i let it roll back, there is no clunk when i start it and shift to reverse and then release the E brake to get out of the driveway.

Sounds like yours got gummed up and is sticking a little, thats how mine was when it felt sloppy. But im not sure what they did to get it back to normal aside from cleaning it and lubing it. Im sure the MKV is different than the old Jetta was.

Good luck.
 

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It still holds, I just don't like the feel. As soon as I get a free weekend, and some cooler weather, I'll pull it off and take care of it. I'll let you know what I run into.
 
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